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Blueprint for the 21st Century
Innovation Management

 

Crafting A Worldwide Innovation Vision

Innovation must be in the head, heart and hands of every participant in the system. It does not mean that everyone is an expert technician and expert marketer at the same time. What it does mean is that everyone has knowledge of the entire innovation system and his/her particular role in that process. It does mean that there is some common language and shared purpose, and that the boundaries fade between functions, sectors, industries and cultures of the world. It means that there is a basic trust, mutual respect and collegial competencies. In addition, it is likely that a thirst for learning pervades the culture.

That being the case, players at all enterprise levels (from microeconomic to macroeconomic) can share these modern management philosophies, an in so doing overcome the barriers and obstacles to progress. Academics, government officials, industrial executives and non-profit practitioners may all participate in this community of innovation practice. With this in mind, a three-dimensional transformation matrix has been and can be applied (see Figure 3). This includes the activities that can be mapped according to the different economic levels, as well as the three elements of the architecture: economic, behavioural and technological.

Figure 3: Three-dimensional transformation matrix
Figure 3: Three-dimensional transformation matrix

Management accountants should think about their activities, according to three time lines: immediate (one year), medium term (one to three years), and long term (three to six years). These can be completed function by function, business unit by business unit, company to company, sector to sector, and nation to nation. In short, this is the blueprint that could provide a mega-level view to contrast the innovation activities.

This is an analysis that can be performed to any useful level. In considering a vision for the future, the stretch is the creation of the global innovation infrastructure, with regional collaboration for shared prosperity.

Germany hosts The World’s Fair in the year 2000. Hundreds of theorists and practitioners in the new community of knowledge practice ill convene for a Worldwide Innovation Congress. Economic, behavioural and technological issues will be reconciled there. A common language will evolve that promises to bring together the foundations of knowledge and the process of innovation in ways never before considered.

This vision is achievable. It is inevitable that some events will prompt a worldwide understanding of the real value of intellectual capital and how it can be put to societal advantage. Given recent initiatives by the European Union, the OECD and The World Bank, such a vision may be closer to reality than previously thought.


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